Master Bathroom Remodel

August 4, 2017 — Leave a comment

Recently, I found water getting into the wall of my home’s master bathroom.

Before I can find out precisely how much damage there is, I am going to have to start demolition and pull the shower enclosure out. This is major work. I did not plan to do a master bathroom remodel. I would prefer to ignore the problem and hope it goes away. Being proactive pays dividends. Praise God, I have great friends, good research skills, and a funded home repair fund. I still would rather avoid the master bathroom remodel and not know what I am buying. God has gifted me with the tools and information to handle this project.

Finding the problem was just the first part of the master bathroom remodel. Writing out the plan for the remodel was the second step (and now mostly done). Researching all the components and elements of the remodel has taken a lot of time. Finally, this week, the contractor and I had an in-depth discussion regarding the remodel. We agreed on who was responsible for which materials, for instance I will get the floor and wall tiles, the contractor will get the mud, shower pan, and grout (with sealant!).

In finalizing the plan, we agreed on start date, check in dates, and overall budget.

What I WANT to do is remodel this bathroom, remove the popcorn ceilings in the bathroom and attached master bedroom, as well as put down the new flooring in the bathroom and attached master bedroom. What I NEED, and now have, is an understanding of when we will know the scope of this remodel (tear out shower enclosure, replace it plus toilet, flooring and vanity top, or do a full gut of the bathroom and rebuild up from the studs and foundation. My contractor knows my budgetary and aesthetic decision points. We have agreed upon appointments for discussing next steps such as do we just redo what needs to be done in the bathroom or does this become a master bathroom and bedroom renovation.

Home repairs are one of those cash flow planning surprises that can upset money goals. The money win is having savings that can go immediately to repairing this problem. The information win is being comfortable with budgeting so when the overall budget number is agreed on, the contractor and I are both clear on the expectations. The experiential win is knowing that most projects overrun the initial budget and the savings can cover an additional 10% – 20% before more drastic steps need to be taken.

To repair this bathroom, we start with what is needed. The highest priority needs on this project list include:

  • tile for the shower enclosure, shower floor and bathroom floor,
  • shower pan, drain/flange/cap,
  • cement backer board,
  • new toilet,
  • new vanity top,
  • paint for the bathroom cabinets, walls and trim
  • and the other small necessaries like mud, grout, mastic, sealer, spackle for the drywall, cement boards, and/or subfloor/foundation, 1/4 inch rounds, etc.

 

To be continued…..